Lost ballparks : a celebration of baseball’s legendary fields


Format:
Book


Author(s):
Ritter, Lawrence S.


Keyword(s):
Baseball fields -- United States -- History.


Year:
1992


Pages:
xiii, 210 p.


Publisher:
Viking Studio Books


Publisher location:
New York


Accession number:
24378823


Label:
Box 32


Notes:
ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm. Baker Bowl (Philadelphia) -- Braves Field (Boston) -- Comiskey Park (Chicago) -- Crosley Field (Cincinnati) -- Ebbets Field (Brooklyn) -- Forbes Field (Pittsburgh) -- Gilmore Field (Los Angeles) -- Griffith Stadium (Washington, D.C.) -- Hilltop Park (New York City) -- League Park (Cleveland) -- Memorial Stadium (Baltimore) -- Montreal Stadium and Jarry Park Stadium (Montreal) -- Municipal Stadium (Kansas City) -- Nicollet Park and Metropolitan Stadium (Minneapolis) -- Offermann Stadium (Buffalo) -- Polo Grounds (New York City) -- Seals Stadium (San Francisco) -- Shibe Park (Philadelphia) -- Sportsman's Park (St. Louis) -- Wrigley Field (Los Angeles). Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-206) and index. by Lawrence S. Ritter. Book


Language:
English


Call number:
LC: GV879.5; Dewey: 796.357/06/873


ISBN:
ISBN: 067083811X; 9780670838110 LCCN: 91-32106


Abstract:
Lawrence S. Ritter retells the legend of 22 immortal ballparks, including seven history-laden minor league stadiums. His anecdotal text tells us everything pertinent about each park--its location, its architecture and dimensions, and stories about memorable players. Ritter recounts baseball's milestones, such as the first televised game (1939) and the first night game (1935), plus what Ritter considers the ten most memorable moments for each major league stadium, such as Jackie Robinson's first turn at bat at Ebbets Field in 1947, and Cleveland Indian Bill Wambsganss' unassisted triple play in the fifth game of the 1920 World Series. Features nearly 250 photographs, 29 in color, including candid shots of baseball's heroes, and memorable photographs of the parks themselves--aerial views, exteriors, and interiors--and of the fans, evoking the simple splendor of baseball in those days.--From publisher description.


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